March 1, 2010

Festival of the Trees #45: Voice

fott intro.jpg

"...proud and hopeful by the side of the road, unaware of the strange shape it will take when branches interfere with wires…"
-Jennifer Schlick of A Passion for Nature, "Branches"

"The air smells sweet – sharp clean snow marked with the fragrance of cold pine, fir, hemlock oils, and morning chimney smoke. Trees hold fluffy handfuls of snow. On the days of deepest snow drifts, the youngest trees are bent completely to the ground and hidden under heavy white blankets which reach up the trunks of larger trees and fold the whole winter world in around you."
-Jade Blackwater of Aboreality, "In Praise of Winter: Snowy Evergreen Sunrises Introduction" (Parts 1, 2, 3, 4)

"The bird's nest, ferns and various orchid species are the most common of the epiphytes seen in the city of singapore."
-Arati of Trees, Plants and More, "Epiphytes"

"It was a wet spring: record-setting wet. The place had been abandoned for several months, and the resulting wall of trees and vines and weeds that surrounded the house made the leaves a real in-your-face presence. Leathery oak leaves. Sandpapery elms. Frilly chinaberry. Cedar elms with foliage that reminds me of cornflakes. All different, and all keys to identifying the tree."
Joy K. of The Little House in the Not-So-Big Woods, "When the Leaves Are Gone"

"[Sweetgum pods] remind me of mysterious southern nuts and seedpods encountered while out walking the dog in Texas. In a stiff wind, heavy pods showered down around us like hail, while others scuttled after us along the sidewalk like misshapen bugs."
Melissa of Out walking the dog, "Seed Pods and Eyeballs"

"Sometimes there is a theme underneath the broader canopy of trees, but mostly, anything tree like is accepted."
-Jasmine of Natures Whispers, "Bluebell Woods"





"The Fig tree has enormous aboveground roots. It must be due to its age & I have never seen roots so high. The height of the roots gives me a strange, but wonderful feeling of entering the tree when I walk up close. It is like being embraced."
-Saving Our Trees, "St Stephen’s Fig"

"Pawpaw is the common name for plants in the genus Asimina, with several species native to eastern North America. A. triloba has the most northern range by far of the genus, reaching into New York, and even southern Ontario, and west to Nebraska. This wide range is attributed to cultivation and distribution by Native American people, including the Cherokee and Iroquois."
-Xris of Flatbush Gardener, "Asimina triloba, PawPaw"

"Maple sugaring is simple. You wait until winter is beginning to slope off like a guest who stayed a bit overtime."
-Diane Tucker of Hill-Stead's Nature Blog, "You Can’t Always Get What You Want"

If you were living just across and if I were a tree
In that yard,
I’d delight you with fruit,
I’ll be watered with your glimpse,
just look at me in ardor,
I’d bear the sweetest fruit for you.
-Tatjana DebeljaĨki, "A HOUSE MADE OF GLASS"

"A cluster of parchment fungi survive on a fallen tree trunk."
-JSK of Anybody Seen My Focus?, "Campground – Dam Loop: Revisited" (Fort Yargo State Park)




"I am kind of at a loss to explain how this happened… or why it took me so many years to notice it. I don’t know how many more years we’ll have canopy-height beeches in the hollow — not too far north of here, all the big beeches are dead — so I figure I’d better start paying more attention to them now."
-Dave Bonta of Via Negativa, "Beech Grotesquerie"

"I can’t imagine what it must be like to be tree-bereft, or tree-oblivious. I’m sure I’ve not been as open-hearted as I could be with trees, but I’m learning, and they are great teachers."
-Beth Patterson of Virtual Tea House, "tree love: out of the closet"

"If only it were true. But the day will come, my t-shirt will read, when all the trees around us are computers."
-Geoff Manaugh of BLDGBLOG, "Three Trees"

"I thought that if the bomb shelter fell through, a tree house would look reasonable in exchange. And how groovy to have a tree house for sleep overs. There was one small problem with the backyard tree house. No tree."
-Rambling Woods, "All children Should be able to visit a special place in the woods..."

"Snow on a rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) branch."
-Ash of Treeblog, "Finding a way"





"Large mammals like the giant panda are particularly sensitive to fragmentation due to their need for space within a preferred habitat, the dense forest. It’s not just territorial; it has a lot to do with biodiversity. The size of these patches determines the diversity of the forest, which creates these smaller habitats like core or dense forest."
-The Voltage Gate, "Forest fragmentation and the isolation of the giant panda (a goodbye to Tai Shan and Mei Lan)

"Lying beneath a large eastern white pine is sheer bliss. Because it sheds half its needles every fall, they provide a soft covering over the hard ground. It is there I listen to the wind soughing in the pines and am perfectly content."
-Marcia Bonta, "The Tree of Great Peace"

old man and the sequoia
Since I came to the United States in 1903, I saw, faced, and heard many struggles among our Japanese Issei. The sudden burst of Pearl Harbor was as if the mother earth on which we stood was swept by the terrific force of a big wave of resentment of the American people. Our dignity and our hopes were crushed. In such times I heard the gentle but strong whisper of the the Sequoia gigantea: "Hear me you poor man. I've stood here for more than three thousand and seven hundred years in rain, snow, storm, and even mountain fire still keeping my thankful attitude strongly with nature - do not cry, do not spend your time and energy worrying. You have children following. Keep up your unity; come with me." So, in the past, all such troubles moved like a cool fog.
Chiura Obata, Topaz Moon


Festival of the Trees #46 will be at Vanessa's Trees and Shrubs Blog
Deadline: March 29
Email: treesandshrubs.guide [at] about.com
Optional theme: Humorous trees (in honor of April Fools)

5 comments:

  1. Very creative format. Really enjoyed the illustrations.

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  2. Nice, Jeremy. Thank you.

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  3. Thank you for hosting the Festival. I've had a wonderful time browsing through all of the entries.

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  4. a delightful presentation.. i'm still working my way through the links.. enjoying each one of them!
    thanks for putting it all together.

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